Montrose Water Sports Park

Overview
Montrose now has its very own Water Sports Park, thanks in part to a $259,000 grant from Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO), obtained in partnership with the Montrose Recreation District. 

The park has been designed with all citizens in mind – from ankle waders to expert kayakers. It will include six drop structures, terraced spectating areas, and beach areas. Fish habitat mitigation upstream of the fishing pier in Riverbottom Park and construction of soft-surface trails around the McNeil Fields and concrete trail adjacent to the Ute Fields have been completed. 

Design work and the required permitting for the park were completed in 2014, clearing the way for construction of the Water Sports Park itself. River structures were finished in early 2015.


Visit the main Water Sports Park page
Construction Milestones

February 9, 2015 - Construction of the Water Sports Park is nearly complete and Mike Harvey, the water park design consultant with Recreation, Engineering, and Planning was taking advantage of the great weather to test out his design (see photo gallery pics).  Haynes Excavation (in cooperation with Stonefly Earthworks) has completed the project within budget and approximately two months ahead of schedule.  The City would like to extend a special thanks to everyone involved in making this project a success.  Stay tuned for information regarding a ribbon cutting celebration for the park this upcoming spring and a whitewater festival scheduled for late summer.  Enjoy your new Water Sports Park!!!

January 23, 2015 - The contractor has completed all six of the drop structures and is nearly done working within the river.  The focus over the next few weeks will be construction of the ADA-accessible put in and take out ramps, recreation trails, and final site restoration. Haynes Excavation and Stonefly Earthworks are at least a month ahead of schedule.  We will be riding waves soon!

January 8, 2015 - Construction of drop structures 3 and 4 is complete as well as the adjacent bank stabilization and spectator area along the western bank of the river.  We are now on the home stretch!  The river is bypassed into the temporary pipes and construction is starting on the last two drop structures.

December 5 - The contractor has diverted the river into the bypass piping around drop structures 3 and 4 and is scheduled to begin their assembly on Monday.  Drop structures 1 and 2 are complete as well as the terraced spectator area immediately downstream of the pedestrian bridge.  We hope this great construction weather keeps holding out!

December 2 - Construction of drop structures number one and two has been completed. Excavation for structures 3 and 4 is next on the project schedule.

November 14 - Construction within the river started on 11/5 after Colorado Parks and Wildlife completed their fish count surveys.  The contractor has bypassed the river into twin 48 inch pipes around the first two whitewater drop structures at the upstream end of the project and is planning to set the first drop structure this afternoon.  Concrete pours to fill the drop structures will likely start on Tuesday.  Prior to construction in the river, the contractor was able to take advantage of some favorable weather and construct about 1,300 feet of the concrete recreation trail.  The remainder will be constructed in the spring. 
 
So far, there haven’t been any major surprises, complications, or safety issues.  As with any project within a river, water management is the largest challenge but so far the contractor has done a great job of staying ahead of it.

February 25 - Construction of aquatic habitat improvements on the Uncompahgre River at the upstream end of River Bottom Park have been completed with the goal of increasing fish populations through this reach of the river and providing additional fishing opportunities for residents and visitors. The aquatic habitat improvements include re-grading of approximately 1,500 linear feet of the river channel, constructing four riffle-pool-glide sequences, and the addition of numerous habitat-boulder clusters.
Project Funding
The Montrose Water Sports Park is supported, in part, through a $259,384 grant from Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO). The project was one of eight that were selected from a statewide field of 51 project proposals that were submitted under GOCO’s Spring 2013 Local Parks and Outdoor Recreation grant cycle. Strong intergovernmental collaboration involving the Recreation District, County, and City distinguished the proposal from others in the extremely competitive grant cycle. 

In addition to a significant cash match provided by all three GOCO-eligible entities, the project has the support and involvement of other key partners: the Colorado Department of Local Affairs, the Montrose Recreation Foundation, LiveWell Montrose-Olathe, Friends of the River Uncompahgre, Welcome Home Montrose and the Montrose Community Foundation.
Grant and Project Scope
Project improvements include the Montrose Water Sports Park, nearly 2,000 feet of concrete trail, 1,900 feet of soft-surface trail and signage along the river. Montrose citizens chose a whitewater park and river trails as their highest priority projects during the Uncompahgre Riverway Master Plan process that was completed in early 2011.

Two additional citizen surveys showed widespread support for the other project components that include a sensory playground, fitness stations, picnic tables and baseball/softball field enhancements at the Ute/McNeil Fields. These improvements will improve safety for baseball/softball participants and provide additional amenities for other park users. 
Fish Habitat
Prior to the construction of the Water Sports Park, the City completed construction of compensatory aquatic habitat improvements on the Uncompahgre River at the upstream end of Riverbottom Park. 

The goal of the project is to increase fish populations through this reach of the river and provide additional fishing opportunities for residents and visitors. The aquatic habitat improvements included re-grading of approximately 1,500 linear feet of the river channel, constructing four riffle-pool-glide sequences, and the addition of numerous habitat-boulder clusters.